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Birthmark

Poster for the movie "Birthmark"

Birthmark (2024)

UA 117.20 min - Thriller, Drama - 23 February 2024
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Set in 1999, Lieutenant Daniel returns home six months after being abducted in a war zone and finds that his six month old pregnant wife, Jennifer suffers from health complications. He decides to take her to a natural birthing village for her delivery. As the event unfolds in the birthing village, they become aware of an impending danger deliberately directed at the baby.

Director:  Vikram Shreedharan
Writers:  Vikram Shreedharan, Sriram Sivaraman

Photos

Storyline

Set in 1999, Lieutenant Daniel returns home six months after being abducted in a war zone and finds that his six month old pregnant wife, Jennifer suffers from health complications. He decides to take her to a natural birthing village for her delivery. As the event unfolds in the birthing village, they become aware of an impending danger deliberately directed at the baby.


Collections: Vikram Shreedharan

Genres: Thriller, Drama

Details

Official Website:  https://bccb.tv/
Country:   India
Language:  Tamil
Release Date:  23 February 2024

Box Office

Company Credits

Production Companies:  Sapiens Entertainment [in]

Technical Specs

Runtime:  1 h 57 min
Viewers Rating: 5/5 - (4 votes)

Movie Trailer

Movie OTT

The thriller drama will release on OTT on March 29.

Movie Review

“Birthmark” opens with promise, teasing an intriguing premise through its promotional materials—a couple in wedding attire, blindfolded, reaching towards each other, with the woman cradling a baby bump, all set against the backdrop of an isolated birthing center with cult-like practices. It sets the stage for what could be a gripping narrative centered on a pregnant protagonist, which is refreshing in itself.

The film begins by immersing viewers in an anonymous setting, somewhere on the Tamil Nadu-Kerala border, shrouded in mystery and tension, especially as Jenny arrives at the birthing village against her initial reluctance. The introduction of characters like paramedic Asha, helper Amulu, and guard Sebastian adds layers to the narrative, hinting at deeper complexities within the center.

The first half builds anticipation with occult ceremonies, mysterious pills, and unsettling encounters, while also delving into Danny’s post-traumatic stress disorder from wartime experiences. However, where “Birthmark” falters is in its second half, where these intriguing threads fail to weave together cohesively. The film loses its narrative focus, attempting to blend genres—pregnancy hardships, PTSD, marital challenges—without fully exploring any.

Mirnaa and Shabeer deliver earnest performances amidst visually pleasing cinematography, yet the script’s casual and flimsy approach undermines their efforts. The film teases with high-concept conflicts but ultimately fails to deliver a clear message or resolution. Characters remain in shades of grey, which could have been compelling if the narrative had solidified their arcs.

Overall, “Birthmark” is a film brimming with potential and visual allure, but it succumbs to its unclear narrative vision and lack of cohesive storytelling. It misses the opportunity to delve deeper into its themes of psychological drama and societal commentary, leaving viewers perplexed rather than satisfied. Despite its atmospheric setting and committed performances, “Birthmark” struggles to find its footing, resulting in a disappointing culmination of intriguing ideas that never fully materialize.