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Tarot

Poster for the movie "Tarot"

Tarot (2024)

92 min - Horror - 1 May 2024
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When a group of friends recklessly violate the sacred rule of Tarot readings, they unknowingly unleash an unspeakable evil trapped within the cursed cards. One by one, they come face to face with fate and end up in a race against death.

Writers:  Nicholas Adams

Photos

Storyline

When a group of friends recklessly violate the sacred rule of Tarot readings, they unknowingly unleash an unspeakable evil trapped within the cursed cards. One by one, they come face to face with fate and end up in a race against death.


Collections: Spenser Cohen, Anna Halberg

Tagline: Your fate is in the cards.

Genres: Horror

Details

Official Website:  https://bccb.tv/
Language:  English
Release Date:  1 May 2024

Box Office

Budget:  $8,000,000
Revenue:  $48,027,934

Technical Specs

Runtime:  1 h 32 min
Viewers Rating: 5/5 - (3 votes)

Movie Trailer

Movie OTT

The film was earlier supposed to have been released on June 28 but instead was scheduled for May 10. However, later on, the date was again rescheduled to May 3 which is now the official date of release for Tarot.

Movie Review

Tarot : A Predictable and Pointless Horror Flick

Tarot, directed by Spenser Cohen and Anna Halberg, stars Harriet Slater, Avantika, and Jacob Batalon. The film follows a group of friends who unleash an ancient evil by breaking the sacred rules of Tarot readings. Despite a promising premise, Tarot falls flat, becoming just another forgettable entry in the horror genre.

The story has potential: a cursed Tarot deck leading to Final Destination-style deaths could be an exciting setup. However, the film makes two critical mistakes from the start. First, it’s rated PG-13. Horror movies can work within this rating, but a concept involving a deadly Tarot deck demands a hard R to fully embrace its gruesome potential. Unfortunately, Cohen and Halberg frequently cut away from the action just as things get interesting, leaving much to the imagination and diluting the impact of the scares.

Second, the protagonists are painfully underdeveloped and make nonsensical decisions, even for a horror film. Characters repeatedly ignore rationality, leading to predictable and uninspired set pieces filled with cheap jump scares. For instance, when Haley (Harriet Slater) receives a warning to resist the urge to run, she does the exact opposite, resulting in a series of predictable and unengaging scares.

Visually, Tarot has some decent moments. The film’s use of shadows in a scene on a commuter train, where Lucas (Wolfgang Novogratz) is stalked by the astrologer, is particularly effective. Yet, these rare highlights are overshadowed by the film’s overall lack of depth and creativity. The creatures introduced are underwhelming, and the gore is minimal, further hampered by the restrictive PG-13 rating.

The film’s pacing suffers as well. The interesting set pieces are too few and far between, and the narrative never fully engages the audience. The lack of character development means there is little emotional investment in their fates, reducing the tension and impact of their encounters with the cursed Tarot deck.

Ultimately, Tarot is a missed opportunity. Its promising concept is squandered by poor execution and an overreliance on tired horror tropes. The film’s lack of originality and creativity makes it a forgettable addition to the genre. Audiences deserve better than this half-hearted attempt at horror. While Tarot might make a quick buck at the box office, it fails to deliver the lasting impact and genuine scares that horror fans crave.